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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington. mr. vice predent, thank you very mu for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot a as of last march i got a transplant, got a new heart and it's nothing short of a miracle. it's like taking 30 years off your life. >> rose: some people said to me without that heart transplant your days were numbered. did you have sense of that? >> oh, absolutely. i'd gotten to the point where i'd done bypass and all the various procedures and i got to end stage heart failure, your heart is just no longer moving enough blood to service your vital organs and this was in july of 2010 so i went in for planned surgery. they had to do it on arch emergency basis because everything started to collapse rapidly. and that's when we implanted this -- it's called a left ven
is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going to have parts of our community succeed and parts fail. if government fails, we all fail. >> we don't trust government. but we need government. and government is us, when you come right down to it. those folks in washington weren't landed there from mars. they were elected by us. >> it's a complex problem. people want quick answersment but the fact is that there aren't quick answers. >> these aren't things that can be fixed in election cycle. and the question is do we have the political leadership that is willing to invest that way. >> rational thinking leads to one thing, conclusions. and conclusions are not going to solve the debt problem. emotions on the other hand leads to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and
. >> rose: in less than four days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. economy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and what choices they pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futuri
and extraordinary. tell me how you came to this book and what you hope for to us understanding about the future. >> well, thank you, charlie. you play a unique role in our country, i'm not buttering him up when i say i know you'll agreement i think you're the bester int interviewer that we have in our country, it's great to be with you. (applause) >> and i have thereby ruined every other interview that i will do for this book, i'm sure. i can't-- but thank you for all those kind words. and thank you all for coming. it's great to be back at the 92nd street y. i want to give a shout out to all of the folks at jccs around the country and those on the stair masters upstairs who are watching on the screen. i've always been fascinating by those who try to interpret the evidence compiled by expert communities that have relevance to our common future and i've focused on that in my ca reeferment i did that on climate in the digital world. about eight years ago i went to a conference in switzerland and somebody kd me what are the drivers of global change and i gave an answer, if you were asked you could
? >> sh--she used a professional name when she was working. [sobs softly] she became ill, and she lost her looks because of me. >> but you were only 8 at the time. >> it doesn't matter. [tearfully] she lost her looks, and she died because of me. >> what was her name, john? >> [stutters] tammie. >> can i give you a lift, sir? >> no, thanks. joyce is driving out here. she'll pick me up. >> right. >> what's that? >> i suppose i may as well dump it. >> what is it? >> it was that present i bought for jay. >> oh. >> she didn't want it. i don't think she's over her last relationship. >> lord byron, "selected poems." >> yeah. she had this tatty old book in her house. so i thought i'd buy her a new one. she marked that page in particular. it must be her favorite. >> "so we'll go no more a-roving so late into the night, though the heart be still as loving, and the moon be still as bright." are you? born in a prison... man: who's that young girl? little dorrit? oh, she's nothing. surrounded by secrets... man: there is one thing i should like to ask you. woman: have a care what you wish for. from the
reed. >> so what do you love about being here? >> let us count the ways. >> this is the way that i can explain new orleans. everybody else talks about a quality of life. you live in washington,-- the mondayments, the buildings, the kennedy center, the universities, the great medical centres, very highly rated quality of life. here no one ever speaks of the quality of life, it's a way of life. we have our music, our food, our social structure, our architecture, our body of literature. we even have our own funerals. so weeasure qlity of life by way of life, if our way of iv is intact and our culture is intact, then that's fine. and we don't really, in a big part of our way of life is to be comfortable with our otherness. we really don't aspire. we love to go to new york. we love to go to las vegas, and we love to go to washington, or anywhere. >> rose: even paris. >> paris who wouldn't, you have have to be-- who wouldn't, we love it but what we like is when we come back homwe cme back to a way of life. we little a little dichbly and are comfortable. >> rose: a place to raise your kids. >
can be anywhere, where distance and time are no longer as big a factor as it used to be you can do it all. >> let me give you an example what this means. music is huge, clint davis, he puts on gas ferx the super bowl. i said clint, what is the status of music right now. he said we're in a golden era. we have street bands everywhere. there are 150 different bands that are playing this weekend in new orleans. and so but what is happened is if you think of a street band, the way this guys exist is by tips. and whether what do we carry that young people don't carry, cash, money. >> okay. and so they've developed an app, these silicon via guys that you can tip with your cell phone. so the guy puts it out there so the street musicians are playing, and you just, they have a thing, if you want to tip them five buck, you don't have five bucks you can tip with your cell phone, that is where technology -- >> technology makes culture. >> i was having a great time sort of commuting back and forth between here and new york and never really thinking about this as a place that i would build a perm
they're using them as animal beds, like dog beds and everything. they're just really hot. and this one is really nice because of the exotic skin. i was ecstatic with the price i got this evening. quinn: sold, $325. john: an early carpenter's toolbox with all the tools. early 1900s, look at the auger bits. and they're works of art themselves, they're fabulous. everything in this. somebody has either lovingly cleaned it up or it's been kept this way. that's fabulous. is this the way you found it? kurt sanftleben: it is, it is. the guy who had this, he took exceptional care of his tools. i got this at a country auction about six months ago. i didn't clean anything. i wiped off the box. wow, a man who takes care of his tools. so how many pieces total are in this? about 24, 25. 24, 25 pieces. not counting the individual pieces. i think most of the stuff dates from the early 1900s to 1920s, '30s. yeah, i figured 1900, 1920. the saws are about 1930. what do i have on it? you've got eight bills on it. i've got $800 on it? i have a lot of people want to buy tools out of it. oh, no
to bement and i couldn't put my finger on what that uncertainty is. and that lead us into a deep dive not numbers. that's who we are. we are a numbers company, very data oriented. and we did a deep dive. and the numbers are stunning. >> rose: we conclude with adam posen, president of the peterson institute. >> for those there are sort of two things, the real versus the monetary, the you have to suffer for your sins versus you have to stop the panic. those are in the sense would be the two schools. >> rose: you're in favor of stopping the panic. >> absolutely. >> rose: and not suffering for your sins to you. >> it to the a morality play f you want to do a morality play we can do lots of things like putting bankers in jails and thing like that but not at the macro level no one is being recorded rdz but most people understand we need entitlement reform and it ought to be on the table. >> absolutely. >> rose: mish phenomenon-- fishman and pos enwhen we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> from our studios in
in the most impoverished parts of our world enriches us all. not only because it creates new markets, more stable order in certain regions of the world but also because it's the right thing to do. in many places people live on little more than a dollar a day. the united states will join with our allies to eradicate such extreme poverty in the next two decades by connecting more people to the global economy. by empowering women, by giving our young and brightest minds new opportunities to serve. and helping communities to feed and power and educate themselves. by saving the world's children from preventible deaths, and by realizing the promise of an aids-free generation which is within our reach. ( applause ) you see, america must remain a beacon to all who seek freedom during this period of historic change. i saw the power of hope last year in burma when ain ain welcomed an american president into a home where she had been in prison for years when thousands of burmese lined the streets waving american flags including a man who said there is justice and law in the united states. i want our
lincoln has asked us to work with him to accomplish the death of slavery. >> no one's ever been loved is so much by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> de choose to be born or are we fitted to the times we're born into. >> well, i done know about myself, you, maybe. >> this set els the fate for all coming times. not only the millions now in bondage, but of unborn millions to come. shall we stop this bleeding? >> i am pleased to have tony kushner back at this table. what does adapted screenplay mean. because there's a lot more here than doris's book. >> yeah, i mean the book in 2000 before doris had actually finished it and it was the book that steven asked me to adapt, i read it eagerly and i love it. i think it's a masterpiece. but team of rivals is a 900 page four-way political biography, the living definition of something that isn't going to make a feature length film. and steven i think knew that when he was getting chapter by chapter. so i think that when we say that it was adapted from team of rivals what we mean and i think
the cover story of this week's "time" magazine. it is called bitter pill, why medical bills are killing us. it is the longest piece by a single author ever published by time. it took brill seven months to research and write. he analyzes bills from hospitals, doctors an drug companies to paint an extraordinary picture of medical overspendingment i'm pleased to have stef steven brill back at this table, welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: what got you here this longest piece. >> as you know i like t pick topics where i just feel that i'm curious about them. and for a long time i have just been curious about why health-care costs so much. you know, we've had years of debate about who should pay for health care. how should we do insurance, and who should pay the bills. but i've never seen anyone stop to say hey, wait a minute, how come if will cost you 20 or 25,000 dollars if god-- as you're walking ot of this building, you slip-and-fall and land on your elbow. whwill it cost a million dollars if are you diagnosed th cancer, how come, who's getting the money. >> rose: you, because of all you
. >> exactly. and if you compare us to other countries, we spend the price for prescription drugs in the united states is 50% higher. as a general matter we spend much, much, much, much, more per capita for health care than any developed country. that's the bad news. the worst news is our results are terrible. in that sense-- . >> rose: so we're paying more and getting less. >> in that sense it is a bit like the book i wrote about education. which is we spend more on education, the as a results are not as good. here we spend much, much more on health care and the results-- are not good. >> rose: tell me about this concept of charge masters. >> this is the thing, you know, among the categories of things that affect all of our lives that we never knew about, this would be high on the list. every hospital has this giant list, six, seven, 8,000 items called the charge master. again it's all sort of in code and acronyms but if a nurse gives you a cup to take a pill, the cup is listed in the charge master. the cup, the little paper cup might be $6 it if you get a chest x-ray that something else in th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)

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